ex-fandom blogger

Jul 22

itsvondell:

i’m just curious about what ricky gervais thinks about religion

[video]

(Source: alrightgeorge)

(Source: luckykk, via hairandbrokenglasses)

(Source: goldenretrieverworld, via jamesdooley)

Jul 21

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via dtgsr)

Jul 20

Read More

curiosamathematica:

The Google trend for the search query “quadratic formula”.
It repeats in the same pattern every year. Down in summer, up in September, down again in December and up again in spring time before going down again in the summer. And so it goes on forever.

curiosamathematica:

The Google trend for the search query “quadratic formula”.

It repeats in the same pattern every year. Down in summer, up in September, down again in December and up again in spring time before going down again in the summer. And so it goes on forever.

(via deonte-s)

Jul 19

yugichrist:

krakenwyrm:

dogjpeg:

yugichrist:

yugichrist:

July 18, 2014 - Scientists Discover First Ever Shark Raising Orphaned Bee

Marine Biologist Dr. Kylie Richards made a startling discover last week while piloting an unmanned underwater vehicle over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge - her video feed displayed what appeared to be a white tip shark feeding and caring for a Nevada bumblebee. “I have no idea how the bee is able to breathe underwater,” explained Richards, “But it’s clear to me, without a shadow of a doubt, that this bee is an orphan.”
Richards, an expert in entomology in addition to marine biology, explained that many bumble bees are often separated from their nests when both of their parents are killed by their natural predators, peregrine falcons. “The falcons dive at over 10,000 miles per hour to strike and surprise their prey, bumble bees,” Richards elaborated. She then told us that despite media portrayal, sharks are actually extremely loving parents, often finding orphaned animals of completely different species and raising them as their own.
Using the underwater vehicle’s robotic arm to wave goodbye to the shark and its foster bee, Richards piloted the vehicle back to the ocean surface and loaded it back onto her research team’s ship. “I’m confident that bee is going to have an excellent life in the ocean,” Richards said to herself happily, moments before her ship was attacked by a swarm of weaponized albatrosses, frigatebirds, and storm petrels.

Nature is amazing

thats not a fucking bee its a yellow pilot fish http://www.paparazsea.com/p/community.html

"No I’m pretty sure it’s a bee" - National Geographic

yugichrist:

krakenwyrm:

dogjpeg:

yugichrist:

yugichrist:

July 18, 2014 - Scientists Discover First Ever Shark Raising Orphaned Bee

Marine Biologist Dr. Kylie Richards made a startling discover last week while piloting an unmanned underwater vehicle over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge - her video feed displayed what appeared to be a white tip shark feeding and caring for a Nevada bumblebee. “I have no idea how the bee is able to breathe underwater,” explained Richards, “But it’s clear to me, without a shadow of a doubt, that this bee is an orphan.”

Richards, an expert in entomology in addition to marine biology, explained that many bumble bees are often separated from their nests when both of their parents are killed by their natural predators, peregrine falcons. “The falcons dive at over 10,000 miles per hour to strike and surprise their prey, bumble bees,” Richards elaborated. She then told us that despite media portrayal, sharks are actually extremely loving parents, often finding orphaned animals of completely different species and raising them as their own.

Using the underwater vehicle’s robotic arm to wave goodbye to the shark and its foster bee, Richards piloted the vehicle back to the ocean surface and loaded it back onto her research team’s ship. “I’m confident that bee is going to have an excellent life in the ocean,” Richards said to herself happily, moments before her ship was attacked by a swarm of weaponized albatrosses, frigatebirds, and storm petrels.

Nature is amazing

thats not a fucking bee its a yellow pilot fish http://www.paparazsea.com/p/community.html

"No I’m pretty sure it’s a bee" - National Geographic

(Source: lifeunderthewaves, via deonte-s)

Jul 14

(Source: videogamebread)